Is your marketing automation like a wobbly door handle?

One of the many benefits of marketing automation is that it creates a better experience for the customer. Yet most deployments are still, albeit accidentally, creating friction points that either add ambiguity, confuse or fail to satisfy important questions which negatively impact on the experience. Sometimes the friction may be small and seem insignificant, but marketing automation is about scale and little things can soon add up to something big.

An analogy I often use to help people understand how easy it is to overlook these friction points is the common door handle. There are two types of door handle: a push plate that you push on or a pull handle that you pull on. Simple. When we see them we instinctively know what we need to do to open the door. Push on one, pull on the other. Yet most shops, offices, hotels, or any place a door is used for public access, often have a pull handle on a door you must push to enter.

You probably haven’t actually noticed this seemingly insignificant friction point yourself because you are so used to pulling a door handle and then pushing when you realise it isn’t going to open. This is fine when you are in need of a coffee and you can see the barista through the glass, but in the digital world people take these small blockages as a cue to leave.

The next time you walk into a building with a pull handle on a push door, I want you to do something for me. Give the handle a little shake. Is it wobbly? That wobble is the outcome of hundreds of people pulling on handle only for the door not to open. The wobble is the direct result of accumulated wasted energy.

Does your marketing automation take your customer on a friction-free journey? If you suspect it may have some friction points then the cure is to create a customer buying narrative and see if it flows effortlessly from start to finish. To really get a friction free customer journey takes a blend of decision-making theory, behavioural economics, narrative/storytelling and some technical wizardry. It may seem like a lot of effort to make some small changes but small changes can make a big difference.

HarveyDavid believe that marketing automation should make for a seamless buyer experience, not one dotted with little irritations.